Allotment planning

We have:

• One very large cold frame
• One eight foot by six greenhouse (but not actually erected yet, and not actually on the allotment, it’s still in boxes on the floor at home)
• half of one allotment and three quarters of another, that could technically be called ours, although it doesn’t work like that – we are growing collectively so there’s no dividing up plots into ‘your’ bed and ‘my’ bed, we’re all in the same bed (that’s not as dirty as it sounds)
• good but somewhat clay soil: one allotment suffers from bracing winds, the other may possibly suffer from not much sun at one end.


So now you know as much as I know. What would be your priorities for spring if you were me?

We’ve already ordered potatoes to plant on 201 and 235 has a large bed full of overwintering onions and garlic and a small bed with spring cabbage (not doing well) rhubarb chard (sort of okay) and broad beans – we will want more potatoes on 235 so we have to decide what varieties we’re going to plant there, given that the maincrop suffered from slugs but not blight. Everybody got tomato blight last year, so I’m going to try and work out which varieties might be a bit more blight resistant in Sussex, start them off in the greenhouse and move them down to the allotments when they are ready. But what I really want is to grow something interesting, something exciting, something to celebrate our first spring on both plots – ideas?

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Posted by The Allotment Blogger on Sunday, November 16, 2008

3 Comments:

Blogger Mark Hubbard said...

I'm a little uncertain with the collectivism in the plots :) I'd want to know my bed was my bed: for example, what if one of the collective lets their part of the group bed go weedy? To protect your part you're going to have to weed it regardless, so you'll end up doing the work of the layabouts for them.

That's why the welfare state always devolves into violence.

As for what to do first: I'd hire labour and do it all together :)


My broad beans are starting to pod!

November 19, 2008 at 2:09 AM  
Blogger The Allotment Blogger said...

Ah, well the collectivism is a bit like that - but we do trust the people we're working with. If they don't pull their weight they will find themselves UNDER their beds, fertilising the bean trenches.

Only joking John and Peter, only joking ...

Your broad beans are going to be gorgeous - we grew the red heritage broad beans last year and they tasted wonderful, not as prolific as green ones, but a superb flavour.

November 19, 2008 at 12:51 PM  
Blogger Mark Hubbard said...

Your broad beans are going to be gorgeous - we grew the red heritage broad beans last year and they tasted wonderful, not as prolific as green ones, but a superb flavour.

Yes, I've noticed less flowers on the red broad beans, though the bushes are bigger than the green so I'm still hoping to yield about the same. Will report back in a month or two, hopefully whilst chewing on the fruits of my efforts. (Or beans, in this case).

November 19, 2008 at 1:51 PM  

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